New Primate Species Discovered

First the good news, a new species of primate has been discovered in the Southern Caqueta region of Columbia by researchers from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia in Bogota (Defler et al., 2010). Now for the bad news, Read More...

The Maneaters of Tsavo – Revisited

The events that unfolded in Tsavo (Kenya) in 1898 were unusual to say the least. Laborers were hard at work building a bridge across the Tsavo River and laying track for the Kenya-Uganda Railway. Over a nine-month period Read More...

Amazonian manatee migrations

Manatees, those docile grazing giants of the aquatic world, have an easy life, or so it would seem. In Western Amazonia, however, life is a bit more complicated. Amazonian manatees (Trichechus inunguis) are subject to the seasonal ebbs and flows of the mighty rivers of the Amazonian basin. They have Read More...

Bats use sunset cues to calibrate their magnetic compass

Bats typically emerge from their roosts at dusk to forage for food. They use echolocation (pulses of sound and returning echos) to orient themselves over short distances, avoid objects, and detect prey. Over longer distances, echolocation is Read More...

Marsupial radiations revealed

Living metatherians exist in two strongholds: the Neotropics (Mexico, Central America, and South America) and the Australasian region (Australia, Tasmania, New Guinea, and nearby islands). One hypothesis to explain this odd distribution proposes that metatherians Read More...

Eavesdropping for food

Echolocating bats emit auditory signals with foraging that can be detected and used by other bats in the neighborhood. For example, feeding buzzes, those rapid terminal pulses emitted when prey in detected, might alert nearby bats to a potential food source. Read More...

Cooler heads prevail

Free diving seals routinely dive, and remain submerged, for periods longer than their predicted aerobic dive limits. Are the physiologists’ calculations in error, or is something else going on here? Read More...

Red squirrels adopt orphans

When does it pay to adopt? The benefits to the adopted infant are obvious, but how does the adoptive parent benefit? Rearing offspring is costly, both in terms of time and energy. Why would a parent endure these costs if the offspring is not their own? Read More...

Echolocation or flight first?

The debate continues; did echolocation or flight evolve first in bats? The discovery of a beautifully preserved Eocene bat Onychonycteris finneyi led researchers to conclude that it lacked the morphology of the stylohyal bone (a part of the laryngeal apparatus) necessary for Read More...

Topi males deceive females

When it comes to securing a mate, males can be very deceptive. In certain cases males use false signals, such as alarm calls, to disrupt courtship or breeding attempts by rival males. However, deceptive Read More...

Social networking in baboons

Everyone knows that primates are highly social. Savannah baboon troops typically consist of several unrelated males and one or more matrilineal dominance hierarchies. Female baboons interact with all Read More...

Sea lions recognize the local competition

Australian sea lions (Neophoca cinerea) are among the rarest members of the family Otariidae. They form breeding colonies on the beaches of Australian where males aggressively defend females with a series of Read More...