Listening In – Bats Recognize Echolocation Calls of Other Species

Bat echolocation calls evolved to optimize the information returning as echoes. Consequently, bats that forage or roost in similar habitats tend to evolve similar calls. Because echolocation calls emitted by one bat can readily be overheard by other bats in the area, the question is Read More...

Right-handed Clicks in Porpoises

To be clear, dolphins are not porpoises and porpoises are not dolphins. They are related, of course; both are toothed whales (Odontoceti). However, dolphins belong to the family Delphinidae and porpoises belong to the family Phocoenidae). Porpoises are the smaller, chubbier Read More...

Bats use sunset cues to calibrate their magnetic compass

Bats typically emerge from their roosts at dusk to forage for food. They use echolocation (pulses of sound and returning echos) to orient themselves over short distances, avoid objects, and detect prey. Over longer distances, echolocation is Read More...

Eavesdropping for food

Echolocating bats emit auditory signals with foraging that can be detected and used by other bats in the neighborhood. For example, feeding buzzes, those rapid terminal pulses emitted when prey in detected, might alert nearby bats to a potential food source. Read More...

Echolocation or flight first?

The debate continues; did echolocation or flight evolve first in bats? The discovery of a beautifully preserved Eocene bat Onychonycteris finneyi led researchers to conclude that it lacked the morphology of the stylohyal bone (a part of the laryngeal apparatus) necessary for Read More...